long term – Best Toplink http://besttoplink.info/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:25:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://besttoplink.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png long term – Best Toplink http://besttoplink.info/ 32 32 Homes England, Muse and Legal & General re-commit to The English Cities Fund to develop 6,600 additional homes and meet the upgrading program https://besttoplink.info/homes-england-muse-and-legal-general-re-commit-to-the-english-cities-fund-to-develop-6600-additional-homes-and-meet-the-upgrading-program/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 12:18:29 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/homes-england-muse-and-legal-general-re-commit-to-the-english-cities-fund-to-develop-6600-additional-homes-and-meet-the-upgrading-program/ Homes England, the government’s housing and regeneration agency, Legal & General and the national regeneration company, Muse Developments, have reconfirmed their commitment to their longstanding partnership, The English Cities Fund (ECF), for a new period of ten years until December 2036. will allow it to continue to fulfill its mission of transforming deprived urban areas […]]]>

Homes England, the government’s housing and regeneration agency, Legal & General and the national regeneration company, Muse Developments, have reconfirmed their commitment to their longstanding partnership, The English Cities Fund (ECF), for a new period of ten years until December 2036. will allow it to continue to fulfill its mission of transforming deprived urban areas and creating exceptional new places across England, tripling its development potential to date.

This commitment will enable the construction of an additional 6,600 homes and allow it to reinvest its capital in new long-term urban regeneration projects that will support the leveling of cities and towns, creating places where businesses want to invest and where people want. live and socialize.

This includes a major £2.5billion 240-acre project that ECF has secured in Salford Crescent in partnership with Salford City Council and the University of Salford, which will bring over 3,000 homes, as well as up to to 1 square meter of space to innovate and collaborate, 1m² of offices, shops, leisure and a new multimodal transport hub with active travel to the city at its heart, all in sections of green space. A catalytic infrastructure and public realm project, Salford Rise, which received £13.17m from the first batch of upgrade funding, will provide a green boulevard in the sky that stretches across Fredrick Road to connect the city’s communities to the opportunities for regeneration will create.

Another example is the unique one-generation transformation of St Helens borough-wide, starting from the town centers of Earlestown and St Helens itself. The ECF has partnered with St Helens Borough Council to offer opportunities for the sustainable repurposing and regeneration of areas in the borough, such as the provision of a new market hall, Class A office space, high-quality downtown homes, active transportation infrastructure, as well as extensive public realm improvements. This vision was brought closer to reality in February 2022, when the Cabinet of Council approved the master plan development frameworks, ahead of a planning application later this year.

Together, the regeneration of these two key Leveling Up areas will provide over 4,000 of the 6,600 new homes.

Minister of Housing, Rt. Hon. Stuart Andre said:

Regenerating urban areas and turning brownfields into thriving communities are integral to leveling the country.

Through the English Cities Fund, the public and private sectors are working hand in hand to create new housing and high quality jobs in areas that need it most.

I welcome the extension of the Fund as we continue our work across government to spread prosperity and opportunity.

Sir Michael Lyons, President of the ECF, said:

Our towns and cities are the engine rooms of our economy. Bringing together the investment and regeneration skills of Homes England, Legal & General and Muse Developments, we are uniquely equipped to help reshape and strengthen local economies. Our ability to work at pace but with a focus on long-term impact makes us an exceptional partner for ambitious communities.

We are excited about the prospects ahead as we harness the combined potential of the public and private sectors to unlock value where it is needed for the benefit of local people.

Peter Denton, chief executive of Homes England, said:

The English Cities Fund has a proven track record of successfully tackling ambitious programs that the private sector alone has not been able to achieve. Bringing together the best of the public and private sectors, it has set the benchmark for what good regeneration looks like.

The reconfirmation of our commitment to the ECF marks an important milestone as we mobilize our resources to deliver on the government’s upgrading agenda, creating vibrant new places, jobs, housing and opportunities across the country.

Kate Bowyer, Managing Director of Muse Developments, said:

Since 2001, ECF has played a vital role in bringing upgrading projects to towns and villages in need, generating tangible and generational benefits in all areas of a community.

The ECF is a unique public-private partnership that consistently delivers. Extending its lifespan highlights our collective commitment to improving homes, lives and communities, through the creation of inclusive and connected places.

Bill Hughes, head of LGIM Real Assets, said:

For 20 years, the English Cities Fund partnership has delivered disruptive regeneration – it’s a prime example of the impact and opportunities that come from public and private sector collaboration. But, more work is needed to continue to level our British cities.

The extension of the English Towns Fund will play a key role in ensuring that we really level up and transform the areas that need it most. As we extend the Fund, we are confident that we will have more opportunities to deliver urban developments that demonstrate real imagination and unlock value for our partners and their communities.

ECF works in partnership with councils, landowners and key community stakeholders to transform forgotten places into thriving mixed-use communities and unlock new private investment. The partnership is behind some of the most successful regeneration projects in the UK in recent years, with projects in Salford Central, Liverpool, Canning Town, Wakefield and Plymouth.

To date, ECF has started 2,270 homes, of which 1,801 have been completed, with another 1,800 starts planned by 2026. It has also delivered more than 1 million square feet of commercial space, retail and leisure, and has improved the public spaces and transport links in the regions in which it has invested. ECF’s investment has also acted as a catalyst for new investment in these areas, as evidenced by the 18,000 homes that have been or are being built in Salford and surrounding areas of Manchester.

ENDS

Notes to Editors

The English Towns Fund

The English Cities Fund is a development corporation set up by three of the UK’s leading regeneration and investment organisations. We work in partnership with the public sector to transform urban areas and create great new places.

The fund brings together the combined expertise and ambition of Homes England, the government housing agency; Legal & General investors; and urban regeneration specialists Muse Developments. Our partnership brings together the best of the public and private sectors.

In 2018, we announced the doubling of the fund to £200m, paving the way for new partnerships and investments in urban areas across England.

Since 2001, we have delivered some of the most complex and successful urban regeneration projects in the country. We are proud to have taken on large, inspiring sites in Liverpool, London, Plymouth, Salford and Wakefield and created inspiring new places in the heart of these cities.

Following the expansion of the fund, we are exploring new partnerships with strong public sector organizations to provide large-scale, mixed-use opportunities.

Find out more about The English Cities Fund here.

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Arsenal want £28.9m winger who is a ‘better player’ than Nicolas Pepe and Edu knows how to do it – Tom Canton https://besttoplink.info/arsenal-want-28-9m-winger-who-is-a-better-player-than-nicolas-pepe-and-edu-knows-how-to-do-it-tom-canton/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/arsenal-want-28-9m-winger-who-is-a-better-player-than-nicolas-pepe-and-edu-knows-how-to-do-it-tom-canton/ The focus for Arsenal in the summer transfer window will be on central midfield and striker positions. football.london understand that Mikel Arteta is looking at these areas among a number of expected additions that aim to see more three players arrive. With that in mind, Arsenal will surely see players arrive in other areas of […]]]>

The focus for Arsenal in the summer transfer window will be on central midfield and striker positions.

football.london understand that Mikel Arteta is looking at these areas among a number of expected additions that aim to see more three players arrive. With that in mind, Arsenal will surely see players arrive in other areas of the team.

One position that has seen consistent ties with a variety of players is wide forward. Netherlands international Noa Lang was a previously touted name at the end of the 2021 summer window, but links have resurfaced more recently, suggesting long-term interest from Arsenal.

The advertised price would be in the region of €35m (£28.9m), an accessible fee, but if Arsenal are keen to invest heavily in the striker and central midfielder, it could significantly reduce their possible spend.

However, the possibility of exits facilitating a move would make a deal more likely in addition to the financial benefit of Champions League qualification, a path which seems the only way to convince Lang of the Gunners’ project.

The Arsenal Way spoke to Belgian football expert Bart Lagae in September following the first initial link with the Club Brugge winger. Bart felt the striker would only move to the Gunners if they qualify for Europe’s elite tournament.

“I think Arsenal have a chance to sign him if he qualifies for the Champions League next season because that’s where his ambition lies,” Lagae said.

Interestingly though, Bart called Lang a ‘better player’ than Nicolas Pepe.

“I think for Arsenal it’s [Lang] can on both wings. For example, on the right, in the position of Nicolas Pepe,” Lagae explained.

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“I would say he’s even more goal-focused and assist-focused than Pepe. He’s probably a better player.

“He can have a good combination with Saka. Saka the player running errands and Lang the setter. Lang doesn’t go deep without the ball; he always asks for the ball. So I think having him in combination with Saka and a striker, Aubameyang, etc., would work really well.

Perhaps Nicolas Pepe is the player who spends the summer opening the doors for Lang’s arrival.

football.london understood ahead of the January transfer window that Pepe would consider his options if his playing time didn’t improve.

Despite demands from Lyon and Marseille, Pepe stayed at Arsenal and Mikel Arteta even opened up about how the Ivorian impressed him with a renewed positive attitude.

His goal against Wolves proved vital to earn the three points and perhaps the catalyst the side needed to help them climb into the top four.

It remains to be seen whether he will stay with the club this summer, but the club appear ready to replace him should the 26-year-old move on.

Make sure you are subscribed to The Arsenal way! The Fan Brands team along with many football.london favorites will be producing daily Arsenal content for your enjoyment, including match reactions, podcasts, football fun and interviews. you can follow Tom Canton from the TAW team to keep up to date with their work.

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British High Commissioner Robert Chatterton Dickson’s Speech to Dhaka Reporters’ Unity https://besttoplink.info/british-high-commissioner-robert-chatterton-dicksons-speech-to-dhaka-reporters-unity/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 04:39:51 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/british-high-commissioner-robert-chatterton-dicksons-speech-to-dhaka-reporters-unity/ Shubho oporannho. (Hello.) Ami ekhane ashte pere anondito. (I’m very happy to be here.) I am delighted to address the Dhaka Reporters Unit this afternoon, the last day of the Bengali winter – my favorite season. Free media is the cornerstone of a free society. The role of the press in holding the powerful to […]]]>

Shubho oporannho. (Hello.) Ami ekhane ashte pere anondito. (I’m very happy to be here.)

I am delighted to address the Dhaka Reporters Unit this afternoon, the last day of the Bengali winter – my favorite season.

Free media is the cornerstone of a free society. The role of the press in holding the powerful to account – even in uncomfortable ways – is an essential checks and balances to corruption and vested interests.

As George Orwell said, “freedom of the press, if it means anything, means freedom to criticize and oppose”.

I am therefore constantly impressed by the courage and commitment of journalists in Bangladesh despite the many challenges I know you have, and I am delighted that we are able to support you with training and programmes.

Along with other similar partners, we lead the Media Freedom Coalition and this will continue to be a key part of the work of the High Commission in Bangladesh.

It’s a great time to be British High Commissioner in Dhaka.

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the UK and Bangladesh, following Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman’s historic press conference at Claridges Hotel, his meeting with Prime Minister Edward Heath and his return to a Bangladesh newly liberated by the Royal Air Force. .

Over the next half-century, the relationship transformed.

On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of Brit Bangla Bondhon, we build on all the links that exist between Bangladesh and the UK, including the diaspora, the 600,000 people living in the UK with Bangladeshi heritage and the much wider range of ties that exist between us. on security, defence, climate, COVID-19, trade and a host of issues that we are working closely with friends and partners within and beyond government in Bangladesh.

We do this in accordance with our overall strategy. Last year we published an Integrated Review of our foreign policy after leaving the European Union. A key element is what we call an Indo Pacific Tilt, a rebalancing of our politics, in which Bangladesh plays an important role.

The Indo-Pacific is the fastest growing economic region in the world, a crucial transit point for global trade.

The UK has the broadest and most integrated regional presence in Europe, supporting stronger trade links, shared security priorities and shared values.

We engage deeper in the region on many of the world’s most pressing challenges – from climate and biodiversity to maritime security and geopolitical competition over rules and standards.

And these standards have never seemed more important or more threatened than today. An unprovoked Russian aggression against Ukraine would be a disaster for everyone, including Russia.

British ministers have been at the forefront of international efforts to find a diplomatic solution, and the UK has provided Ukraine with the weapons and training it needs to defend itself.

Here we are working with UK businesses to build a trade and development relationship as Bangladesh transitions this decade from a less-developed to a middle-income country.

This is an extraordinary national achievement, based on decades of good policy development. I am delighted that the Prime Minister and other senior officials promoted the opportunities at a roadshow in London and Manchester last year.

Graduation is a milestone, not a finish line and we are helping Bangladesh achieve smooth and successful graduation and continue its export-led growth by providing duty-free and quota-free access to the UK market until ‘in 2029.

We are Bangladesh’s second largest investor and will continue to work with Bangladesh to ensure free and fair trade by improving the functioning of the WTO and modernizing global trade rules.

The past year has been significant for UK-Bangladesh trade relations with the inauguration of the UK-Bangladesh Trade and Investment Dialogue.

This was to tackle barriers to market access and improve the business environment to promote free and fair trade between the UK and Bangladesh, and to help UK businesses to realizing the potential of Bangladesh’s impressive economic growth, for the benefit of the prosperity of both countries.

As Bangladesh prospers, we hope to see the market become more open to international investment, particularly for high-value financial, education and health services where the UK is the world leader.

I see a particular opportunity for universities if the rules of cross-border higher education can be implemented. UK universities are interested in the opportunity in Bangladesh and would like to establish the kind of presence they have in Sri Lanka or Malaysia.

This would give young Bangladeshis access to world-class education at a competitive price. And that would give Bangladesh the skills to thrive as a middle-income country.

More generally, our view is that long-term stability and economic growth flourish best in open, democratic societies with strong institutions, public accountability and competitive elections.

Thus, with international partners, we support the pluralistic and transparent democracy in Bangladesh provided for by the Constitution, in particular by calling for a fair and credible process for the elections scheduled for the end of 2023.

This means first of all that all the parties must be allowed to organize themselves and be heard before the election so that there is a real debate on the future of the country. Second, it means everyone can vote freely. Third, it means votes are reliably and transparently counted. And finally, it means that credible results are accepted by all parties, including those who did not win.

Milestones such as the process of forming the Electoral Commission send a signal on the trajectory of this administration. Strong commitments from all parties to a free and fair process would help set the tone, including inclusive and non-partisan oversight of the Electoral Commission for the contest scheduled for next year.

The strongest, safest and most prosperous societies are those in which everyone can live freely, without fear of violence or discrimination, and where all citizens can play a full and active role. This year, the UK will host a global conference on equality to promote the basic human rights we all share. This includes empowering women and girls and standing in solidarity with those who uphold tolerance and religious freedom, as enshrined in the Constitution of Bangladesh, which enshrines freedom of expression and religion.

We stand with those who uphold tolerance and religious freedom, as enshrined in the Constitution of Bangladesh, which enshrines freedom of speech and religion.

We also work together on regional security, including the Rohingya crisis. Our common goal is to see the voluntary, safe and dignified repatriation of Rohingya as soon as conditions in Myanmar permit.

Bangladesh continues to be extraordinarily generous in its response. Refugees have access to health care, food, shelter, water and sanitation.

We have seen generosity in the deployment of COVID-19 vaccines for refugees. However, despite the progress, the situation remains difficult both for the Rohingya, especially for the women, and for their hosts in Bangladesh.

We are the leading donor to the international response to the Rohingya refugee crisis, having contributed over £320 million since 2017 to support both refugees in camps and host communities, including building resilience against COVID-19.

At the same time, the Rohingya crisis is a tragedy for everyone involved. No one chooses to live in a refugee camp or host a massive influx of displaced people. Like so many other refugees around the world, the vast majority of the Rohingya population say they want to return home.

We are ensuring that the Rohingyas and Bangladesh are not forgotten. We are raising the plight of the Rohingyas on the international stage, including at the United Nations Security Council. As ASEAN’s new dialogue partner, we support the efforts of the ASEAN Special Envoy.

We support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh. We are supporting the Ministry of Health in Bangladesh to develop a well-coordinated national response plan, funded by all development partners and the Government of Bangladesh.

Last December, we supplied 4.1 million vaccines through the COVAX facility. We hope to provide more soon.

And 2021 has been a good year for UK-Bangladesh defense relations as a Royal Navy ship sailed to Chattogram after 13 years as part of our Carrier Strike Group (CSG21) deployment to the Indo-Pacific region.

The visit highlighted our bilateral defense relationship, echoed this week by strategic level training provided by the UK at the Bangladesh National Defense College.

I look forward to talks soon to put this relationship on a more strategic footing.

The UK-Bangladesh Climate Partnership launched in January 2020 strengthens cooperation on all COP26 priority themes: adaptation, clean energy, nature financing and clean transport.

We will continue to exchange our expertise, share our technologies, facilitate partnerships and identify practical solutions to common climate challenges, with the common goal of delivering the real change we need to keep rising global temperatures in check. below 1.5 degrees.

I think we can do more in this area as well.

It is therefore an exciting time for the UK here, as we work with an increasingly confident and outward-looking Bangladesh, tackling common challenges and seizing shared opportunities as we move together towards the next 50 years.

I am delighted to be here as High Commissioner leading the effort in Dhaka.

Apnader jonno shubho kamona roilo (Best wishes) Sobaike onek dhonnobad. (Thank you everybody.)

More information

British High Commission in Dhaka

United Nations Road

Baridhara

Dhaka – 1212

Bangladesh

Email: Dhaka.Press@fco.gov.uk

Follow the British High Commissioner to Bangladesh on Twitter: @RCDicksonUK

Follow the British High Commission in Dhaka on TwitterFacebook, Instagram and Linkedin

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Bukayo Saka shows why Arsenal are preparing to make him the highest paid player amid transfer links https://besttoplink.info/bukayo-saka-shows-why-arsenal-are-preparing-to-make-him-the-highest-paid-player-amid-transfer-links/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 17:24:04 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/bukayo-saka-shows-why-arsenal-are-preparing-to-make-him-the-highest-paid-player-amid-transfer-links/ Arsenal are in talks with Bukayo Saka over a new contract extension which would make him one of the club’s highest-paid players, as revealed exclusively football.london . Saka, 20, has a long-term contract with the club which expires in 2024 but football.london understands that a new deal will reflect his role in the team as […]]]>

Arsenal are in talks with Bukayo Saka over a new contract extension which would make him one of the club’s highest-paid players, as revealed exclusively football.london .

Saka, 20, has a long-term contract with the club which expires in 2024 but football.london understands that a new deal will reflect his role in the team as one of the most important players.

Alexandre Lacazette, Bernd Leno and Eddie Nketiah are among the senior first-team players set to leave the club in the coming months, which will give the Gunners extra financial firepower when building up a lucrative contract for their best players.

And Saka showed against Brentford why it’s crucial that Arsenal secure Champions League football this season – and fulfill their competitive ambition and the highest level week in and week out.

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The England international has scored five goals in his last six Premier League appearances, a form that underlines his importance to Arsenal and once again places him among the greatest talents in European football.

Mikel Arteta’s side dominated their opponents on Saturday afternoon, producing 16 shots in the first 45 minutes – the most the team had in a Premier League first half since October 2017 against Everton under Arsene Wenger.

Emile Smith Rowe has scored five goals in his last eight Premier League starts. Only three players have scored more goals than Smith Rowe this season, with the likes of Mohamed Salah, Diogo Jota and Raheem Sterling sitting above Arsenal’s No10, a testament to how much he has improved on the goals front compared to last season.

There are certainly plenty of reasons to be excited about North London’s red side right now. Academy graduates are scoring, smooth football is being played and a Premier League points tally that is starting to look like European football is a real possibility.

There’s still a long way to go, but right now there’s a lot of positives at Arsenal.

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Medical Foster Homes at Fargo VA Health Care System | VA Fargo Healthcare https://besttoplink.info/medical-foster-homes-at-fargo-va-health-care-system-va-fargo-healthcare/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 16:43:46 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/medical-foster-homes-at-fargo-va-health-care-system-va-fargo-healthcare/ When home life gets tough, most people would rather stay in a family setting than move to a nursing home. At times like this, the VA Medical Foster Home program is here to help. A VA Medical Foster Home offers an alternative to nursing home placement. It provides an alternative to a veteran who may […]]]>

When home life gets tough, most people would rather stay in a family setting than move to a nursing home. At times like this, the VA Medical Foster Home program is here to help. A VA Medical Foster Home offers an alternative to nursing home placement. It provides an alternative to a veteran who may be chronically ill or terminally ill with limited social support by providing a home and family setting for their long-term care needs. The veteran must have the financial resources to pay the cost of care. The cost of care is determined by the level of care. The veteran will receive regular care and visits from the VA home primary care team: advanced registered nurse practitioner, nurse, social worker, dietitian, psychologist, occupational therapist, and recreation therapist.

Medical foster homes provide

  • Long-term care option that encourages the highest level of independence
  • Private furnished room
  • 24 hour care/supervision
  • Medication management
  • Personal care (dressing, grooming, bathing, etc.)
  • Meals, laundry, cleaning
  • Flexible daily routine
  • Personalized care
  • Transport
  • A maximum of 3 veterans receiving home care
  • High levels of caregiver and veteran satisfaction
  • Assistance for chronic illnesses

Medical caregivers

  • Must pass annual inspection by VA inspection team
  • Criminal background check
  • Complete bi-annual training
  • The house must be owned or rented by the caregiver
  • Must be 21 or older, financially stable, complete application process
  • Are flexible and have positive problem-solving skills
  • Have experience caring for patients
  • Are physically able to provide necessary care
  • Must have a written back-up plan if unable to provide care
  • Must work with VA home primary care team
  • Create a caring and family environment

Medical Foster Home Videos

As an option for veterans enrolled in the Primary Home Care Program, some VA medical centers offer medical care in a traditional foster home. Because homes are limited to a maximum of three residents, veterans who qualify receive highly individualized long-term care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. ‘increased strength, less dependence on drugs and being happier.

The VA’s Medical Foster Home program provides long-term care to many disabled and aging veterans who prefer to live in a family setting rather than an institutional one.

Most veterans don’t want to go to an institution for their aging care, so VA has worked to expand the Medical Foster Home program, which allows caregivers to care for veterans in their own homes.

Related links to Medical Foster Home news:

https://www.cbsnews.com/video/families-open-up-their-home-and-hearts-to-serve-veterans/

https://www.thedoctorstv.com/videos/new-care-program-pairs-veterans-caregivers

https://www.today.com/series/veterans/foster-families-veterans-open-their-homes-hearts-t166561

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Four transfer deals Edu expected to complete for Arsenal on deadline day https://besttoplink.info/four-transfer-deals-edu-expected-to-complete-for-arsenal-on-deadline-day/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/four-transfer-deals-edu-expected-to-complete-for-arsenal-on-deadline-day/ The transfer deadline is fast approaching and, from Arsenal’s point of view, there is still a lot to do. The Gunners have largely focused on cleaning house so far in January, allowing Flo Balogun, Ainsley Maitland-Niles, Pablo Mari and Karl Hein to leave on loan. Meanwhile, Calum Chambers has joined Aston Villa on a permanent […]]]>

The transfer deadline is fast approaching and, from Arsenal’s point of view, there is still a lot to do.

The Gunners have largely focused on cleaning house so far in January, allowing Flo Balogun, Ainsley Maitland-Niles, Pablo Mari and Karl Hein to leave on loan.

Meanwhile, Calum Chambers has joined Aston Villa on a permanent basis and Sead Kolasinac has had his contract terminated at the Emirates Stadium in order to secure a transfer to Marseille.

However, on the entrances front, it has been painfully quiet on the red side of north London.

With so many players leaving, there are concerns about the depth of squad Arteta will have for the rest of this campaign.

The likes of Mohamed Elneny and Nicolas Pepe will return from the Africa Cup of Nations when Arsenal take on Wolves in their next Premier League game, but the Gunners’ squad numbers still look a bit light.

football.london understands a deal for goaltender Matt Turner has been sealed, but the USMNT stopper won’t leave the New England Revolution until the summer.

Apart from that though here football.london examines the transactions that must take place on the day of the transfer deadline.

Nikolaj Moller

Centre-forward Nikolaj Moller impressed so much in his first season with the Arsenal Under-23s last time out that many dubbed him the ‘new Zlatan Ibrahimovic’.

The Swede was sent on loan to FC Viktoria Koln in Germany’s third tier earlier this campaign but was recalled after scoring three goals in 13 appearances.

Flo Balogun having left on loan, there was a school of thought that the 19-year-old could spend the rest of this season battling with Mika Biereth for a starting spot in Kevin Betsy’s Under-23s at the club. ‘before.

However, it now looks likely that he will travel to Holland, where he will spend the rest of this campaign with Eerste Divisie side FC Den Bosch.

jack wilshere

Although not technically an Arsenal player, Jack Wilshere has been training regularly with the Gunners first team at London Colney since October.

There have been suggestions the England international could be brought back to the Emirates on a short-term deal to address the lack of depth in midfield, but Mikel Arteta was quick to rule out any possibility of this happening.

The 30-year-old is currently away with the Arsenal squad on their mid-season trip to Dubai but could well leave camp to secure a transfer to his next club.

Many teams in the Championship have shown interest, while Italian side Monza and Greek side AEK Athens are also in the game. football.london understand.

This deal doesn’t have to happen on deadline day because Wilshere is a free agent.



Jack Wilshere during an Arsenal training session at the Nad Al Sheba Training Centre. (Image: Stuart MacFarlane/Arsenal FC via Getty Images)

Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang

The big issue with Arsenal at the moment, however, concerns Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang.

Just over a month ago the 32-year-old was a vital part of Mikel Arteta’s squad, but since being sacked as club captain in December for disciplinary misconduct he has found himself exiled from the rest of the group, and was not invited to the trip to Dubai.

The Gunners are reportedly ready to let the Gabon international go and have received offers from Saudi clubs who are said to be willing to cover his high salary.

However, Aubameyang would like to stay in Europe and it is believed that Paris Saint-Germain and Barcelona have both submitted offers to loan him out for the rest of the season.

If the former Borussia Dortmund striker does end up staying, he is unlikely to feature until the end of the campaign at the time of writing, so his exit could well be secured on transfer deadline day.

A center forward

If Aubameyang ends up leaving, there’s a chance Arsenal will consider making a late move to bring in a centre-forward on deadline day.

The Gunners replaced Dusan Vlahovic earlier this month but the Serbian striker’s preference was unfortunately to stay in Italy and he has since joined Fiorentina.

The 21-year-old wasn’t Arsenal’s only centre-forward target though, and they are believed to be interested in Everton’s Dominic Calvert-Lewin, Lille’s Jonathan David and Real Sociedad striker Alexander Isaac.

It’s the latter deal that seems most likely before the deadline, however, it has to be said that Edu isn’t in the mood to overspend.

Isak has a release clause that is believed to be around the £70m mark, and with just one day to go before the transfer window, Arsenal are aware that their chances of negotiating that drop are severely handicapped.

Instead, it looks likely they will opt for a long-term solution at the striker this summer and stick with Alexandre Lacazette, Eddie Nketiah and Gabriel Martinelli as attacking options as they seek to secure football from the Champions League for the first time in half a decade.

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Study finds that national and international frameworks are imperative to implement nature-based solutions in Asia https://besttoplink.info/study-finds-that-national-and-international-frameworks-are-imperative-to-implement-nature-based-solutions-in-asia/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 15:52:01 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/study-finds-that-national-and-international-frameworks-are-imperative-to-implement-nature-based-solutions-in-asia/ The Challenges of Implementing Nature-Based Solutions in AsiaCross-sectoral strategies and coordination between fragmented institutions and actors are essential for the implementation of NBS in Asia. Credit: Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Japan Recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the term “nature-based solutions” […]]]>

The Challenges of Implementing Nature-Based Solutions in AsiaCross-sectoral strategies and coordination between fragmented institutions and actors are essential for the implementation of NBS in Asia. Credit: Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Japan

Recognized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the term “nature-based solutions” (NbS) refers to those that combine human well-being, environmental sustainability and biodiversity benefits. . NbS are also key components of COVID-19 post-pandemic recovery strategies. NBS include a variety of elements, ranging from ecosystem-based climate change mitigation to ecosystem-based disaster risk reduction measures. While the techniques underlying NBS may not be new, integrating them into national and international governance frameworks for their effective implementation is.

Most studies on NbS focus on Europe. The European Union was an early adopter of the NbS and promoted it by linking the NbS to the European Green Deal and the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. The region has established strong links between the NbS and various actors (governments, institutions, companies, etc.). But the same cannot be said of Asia. There remains a lack of a coherent regional strategy for the implementation of NBS in Asia, as well as limited cross-sectoral local and national governance to promote NbS and green recovery strategies. The large number of developing countries in Asia also presents a problem for the promotion and realization of NBS.

In a new study published in Policy and governance, researchers Dr. Kanako Morita from the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute and Associate Professor Ken’ichi Matsumoto from Toyo University, Japan elaborated on the governance challenges of implementing NbS in the East, Southeast and South Asian regions. “Implementing NbS governance in countries at different stages of economic development is tricky, as is crafting NbS measures with different institutions and actors,” says Dr. Morita.

Findings from their study indicated that climate change mitigation, disaster risk reduction (DRR) and infrastructure are three areas where NBS have been widely implemented in Asian countries. These areas are also linked to climate security issues, including ecological security. However, further work is possible, particularly to ensure uniformity of NbS implementation across various regions. “Current discussions on NbS governance focus on urban areas, but Nbs are essential across a wide range of landscapes and seascapes and across jurisdictional boundaries. In developing countries in particular, international cooperation is necessary in the governance of NBS”, observes Dr Morita, in this context.

The researchers found that the NbS have links to international frameworks linked to the UNFCCC and the CBD in the field of climate change (climate change mitigation), with clear national strategies, policies and international financial mechanisms. The Paris Agreement is one of the main drivers of this development. Unfortunately, however, discussions on cross-sectoral strategies, such as the application of NbS to post-pandemic green recovery, have so far not been extensive in Asian countries.

In the field of DRR, the SNBs are linked to the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR). Japan, in particular, is heavily invested in promoting ecosystem-based DRR (Eco-DRR). But the same cannot be said for other Asian countries. While some countries have integrated Eco-DRR into their national strategies, national governance and implementation measures remain weak. Financial mechanisms for integrating NBS into eco-DRR need to be developed and clarified. Moreover, developing countries in particular need financial and technical support to properly implement NBS for eco-DRR.

Finally, the researchers found no official link between the NbS and international frameworks in the field of infrastructure. “There is no consensus on what NbS means for infrastructure. It is therefore very difficult to establish national policies or frameworks and, more importantly, financial mechanisms for the implementation of NbS,” explains Dr Morita.

Taken together, the study highlights the fragmentation of institutions and actors in Asia, and the unique challenges this poses for different types of NBS. The study also highlights the need for cooperation between local, national and international actors, including governments and institutions. “Our analysis recognizes the need for a cross-sectoral framework to address the need for NbS with relevant actors and institutions at different scales. We also recommend creating guidelines to integrate and promote NbS into local and national policies, as well as in international cooperation”, concludes Dr Morita.

Implementing these suggestions will surely help to deal with the reality of climate change, as well as provide benefits for biodiversity and humans, both in the short term, post-pandemic, and with respect to the long-term sustainable development.


The ocean is our greatest climate regulator. It must be an integral part of climate policy and action


More information:
Kanako Morita et al, Governance Challenges for Implementing Nature-Based Solutions in the Asian Region, Policy and governance (2021). DOI: 10.17645/pag.v9i4.4420

Provided by the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute

Quote: Study finds that national and international frameworks are imperative for implementing nature-based solutions in Asia (2022, January 17) retrieved January 18, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-01 -national-international-frameworks-imperative-nature-based.html

This document is subject to copyright. Except for fair use for purposes of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.

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The misfortune and gloom of the information industry? You won’t find it in college newsrooms. – Pointer https://besttoplink.info/the-misfortune-and-gloom-of-the-information-industry-you-wont-find-it-in-college-newsrooms-pointer/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:21 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/the-misfortune-and-gloom-of-the-information-industry-you-wont-find-it-in-college-newsrooms-pointer/ Every month, I go on a Zoom with Taylor Blatchford, engagement editor for the Seattle Times Investigative Team and editor of The Lead, Poynter’s newsletter for student journalists. We’re sharing our plans for the coming months to make sure we meet the needs of the journalism education community while complementing everyone’s work (and also supplementing […]]]>

Every month, I go on a Zoom with Taylor Blatchford, engagement editor for the Seattle Times Investigative Team and editor of The Lead, Poynter’s newsletter for student journalists.

We’re sharing our plans for the coming months to make sure we meet the needs of the journalism education community while complementing everyone’s work (and also supplementing it frequently, because that’s what friends).

Recently, I told him that the Alma Matters survey, which several of you were kind enough to complete, clarified the desire for more outstanding work by academic journalists, both in classrooms and for academic media.

In other words, you seem to be hungry for examples of quality student journalism.

While we are still perfecting the means to collect such pieces, I wanted to draw your attention to the work of college journalists through last year’s Poynter College Media Project.

If you are looking for examples of meaningful and impactful work for your student media group or for a class assignment, here is a short list of ideas with links to their work.

  • Texas A&M University San Antonio: El Espejo magazine students examined the impact of the pandemic on student groups at this relatively new campus, which is largely suburban and serves a primarily Hispanic student population. The PDF of their fall 2021 magazine is here.
  • The University of Alabama: The Crimson White set out to create a COVID-19 dashboard that would track infection and vaccination rates for students, faculty, and staff. When the university was uncooperative with the records, the team pivoted to cover other COVID-19 stories on campus throughout the semester. Learn more here.
  • The University of Miami: In 2020, the U made national news when it was accused of using facial recognition software on its students, which officials denied. Freelance journalism students from The Hurricane and UMTV thought otherwise and launched a three-part investigation into what constitutes facial recognition, how it’s used in Miami, and the implications for other campuses across the country.
  • Penn State University: The Daily Collegian examined the lasting impact of Jerry Sandusky’s indictments a decade after they were handed down. The result was their “Sandusky’s Imprint” website and a special PDF printing section.
  • The University of Montana: Kaimin students were prepped for a semester of open portage before a court stopped the action. They examined Montana’s gun culture and law and looked to the future to consider the possibility that guns might be a reality in the educational environment in which they studied and worked. The result was In the Crosshairs (website) and this special PDF section.
  • The University of Wisconsin-Madison: Daily Cardinal students investigated the long-term implications of gentrification and the impact of rising student housing construction on the city of Madison. Their final projects were The Student Living Issue (PDF) and their Choose Your Impact website.
  • Hofstra University: Students here wanted to create a nonprofit student media group that would examine the most pressing issues on campus. Their investigation for The Hofstra Clocktower specifically focused on educational disparities in Long Island public schools.

While the Poynter College Media Project is on hiatus pending more funding, we are always on the lookout for great work from college journalists. At any time during the semester, I hope you will send me links to your student work that you are most proud of.

Above all, keep up the good work to help and inspire the next generation of journalists.

Mark your calendars for Student Press Freedom Day, slated for February 24, with the theme “Reactivate”. Learn more at studentpressfreedom.org. Consider how you could work within student media to highlight the importance of press freedom.

NLGJA: The LGBTQ Journalists Association is hosting its second virtual student conference, February 25-26. Students will “learn from media experts, connect with other student journalists, and explore the intersections of the news industry and LGBTQ identities.” Registration is free for NLGJA student members or $25 for non-members.

Here are some insider scoops… Poynter is looking for an audience engagement editor. The ideal candidate will have a bachelor’s degree (or comparable journalism experience), experience managing social feeds, and excellent writing/editing skills, with a focus on social media writing. This is great work for new and recent graduates working directly with Poynter’s editorial team. Ideas and curiosity drive us, and we’re more impressed with someone willing to explore new ways of engaging with our audience of journalists and media aficionados than a lengthy CV. Do you think you have a recent graduate who could be the right fit for you? Send them to us!

This week, we’re featuring the Pulitzer Center, which has two internships open. The Campus Consortium Reporting Fellow Intern and Campus and Outreach Intern will work 10-20 hours per week for approximately one semester with the possibility of extension. Applications are due January 25.

See our full database here.

Last week, signatories to the International Fact-Checking Network, including PolitiFact, wrote an open letter to YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki calling on YouTube to change its policies regarding misinformation proliferating on the site.

The letter reads in part: “Your company’s platform has so far framed disinformation discussions as a false dichotomy of content removal or non-removal. In doing so, YouTube avoids the possibility of doing what has been proven to work: our experience as fact checkers, along with academic evidence, tells us that surface factual, fact-checked information is more effective than removing content. It also preserves freedom of expression while recognizing the need for additional information to mitigate risks to life, health, security and democratic processes.

The group made several suggestions for next steps, including committing YouTube to meaningful transparency on misinformation on the platform and focusing on providing context and offering debunks, clearly overlaid on videos or as content. additional video.

Following the conviction of Ahmaud Arbery’s killers, we examine a local reporter’s diligence and tenacity in investigating the true story behind Arbery’s shooting. You can read these and other case studies here in our Professor Press Card (subscription required).

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New interactive map, webpage highlighting local climate plans https://besttoplink.info/new-interactive-map-webpage-highlighting-local-climate-plans/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 19:00:15 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/new-interactive-map-webpage-highlighting-local-climate-plans/ January 14, 2022 through Pool Lisa Category: Last summer, the MRSC launched its Local Climate Response Project featuring blogs, webinars and new thematic climate pages to help local governments in their climate planning efforts. The first of these new thematic pages, Local Government Climate Change Documents, is now available. On this page, MRSC staff have […]]]>

January 14, 2022
through

Pool Lisa



Category:


Last summer, the MRSC launched its Local Climate Response Project featuring blogs, webinars and new thematic climate pages to help local governments in their climate planning efforts. The first of these new thematic pages, Local Government Climate Change Documents, is now available.

On this page, MRSC staff have compiled a selection of over 300 climate impact-related resources from local governments across the state. Available in two formats — an interactive map and a detailed list — these documents focus on frontline communities (those experiencing the “first and worst” impacts), mitigation (reducing greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (reduction of climate impacts).

This blog provides tips and tricks for using the interactive map and highlights some of the resources included in our new topic page.

Interactive map

The interactive map (see screenshot below) includes icons for Washington State jurisdictions that we know of that have adopted climate-related documents.

WashingtonStateClimateResourcesMap_shaddow_618x586

Using the tabs at the top of the map, you can limit the results to a single type of jurisdiction (counties, cities, tribes or other public bodies).

To view documents from a specific jurisdiction, you can click on the associated icon, and you will see an option “Click here to view document(s)”. This link will open in a new window with links to all documents in this jurisdiction.

To reset the view, click the white area inside the map area but outside the Washington state outline.

Document list

As an alternative to the interactive map, you can also browse these documents by geography and feature type in the sections below the map (see screenshot below). This list is based on the same documents available via the map.

ListCountyClimateDocuments_shaddow_618x586

Examples of plans and studies

Selected documents on our new webpage include climate action plans, resilience and adaptation plans, risk mitigation plans, and comprehensive plans that reference climate change. Below are examples of these resources by plan type.

Climate Action Plans

As discussed in this MRSC blog on Climate Action Plans (CAPs), a CAP identifies greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets based on local priorities and provides a framework for achieving those targets. Also called mitigation or sustainability plans, CAPs can include resilience and adaptation goals (see section below). Here are some examples of CAPs:

  • Spokane’s Sustainability Action Plan – This 2021 plan focuses on equity and identifies strategies and actions to achieve the city’s 100% renewable energy goals that were first adopted in 2018 .
  • Whatcom County Climate Action Plan – This 2021 plan calls for the creation of an Office of Climate Action that would house staff dedicated to coordinating efforts between multiple county departments and the public and promoting climate change. community engagement in projects that build climate resilience.
  • Climate Action Plan for Yakama Nation Territories – This 2019 plan focuses on strategies that foster healthy communities, ecologies and river systems to support tribal historical, cultural, spiritual and economic practices.

Resilience and adaptation planning

According to Whatcom County’s Climate Action Plan (mentioned above), climate resilience is the ability of a system to cope with change and continue to function. This is particularly important given the uncertainty about the timing and magnitude of climate change impacts. Adaptation involves modifying human behavior and/or systems to reduce or avoid likely climate impacts. The following are examples of resilience and adaptation plans:

  • Chelan County-Wide Climate Resilience Planning – The county is developing a strategy that will address impacts such as wildfires, snow accumulation and stream flow, flooding and supply in water. This webpage includes a library of resources on climate resilience and other planning-related resources.
  • Shoreline Climate Impacts and Resilience Study – This 2020 study identifies impacts and areas of vulnerability, with a focus on the Shoreline stormwater system. Educational materials and a mapping tool have been developed to communicate these vulnerabilities.
  • Thurston County Climate Adaptation Plan – This plan was developed by the Thurston Regional Planning Board to help the county and the greater South Puget Sound region prepare for climate change. It was funded by a grant from the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program and in-kind support from the community.

Risk mitigation plans

Hazard mitigation is any sustained action to reduce or eliminate long-term risks to human life and property from hazards. The Federal Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (Stafford Act of 2000) requires state and local governments to develop such plans as a condition of receiving a federal grant. Below are some examples:

Complete packages

As noted on our Global Planning webpage, these plans are the centerpiece of local planning efforts and include goals and policies that guide decision-making and implementation actions. Some plans, such as those below, link the planning objectives of the Washington State Growth Management Act (for example, encouraging development in urban areas with adequate utilities and facilities, reducing sprawl, encouraging multimodal transport, etc.) to climate action, while others do not. t make this direct link.

  • Everett Global Plan: Chapter on Climate Change and Sustainability — This chapter discusses planning for climate change, greenhouse gas reduction, and adaptation. He notes that compact growth with mixed uses that support transportation options will be a key emissions reduction strategy.
  • Jefferson County Comprehensive Plan – Climate action is integrated into several chapters, including land use, environment, and transportation. For example, policy LU-P-24.3 encourages “renewable energy systems in rural areas to support local economic prosperity, gainful employment, (and) local energy resilience…”.
  • Lakewood 2021 Global Plan Update: Energy and Climate Change Chapter — This chapter describes potential impacts, energy consumption and GHG emissions; highlights key findings and recommendations; sets energy and climate change goals; and identifies responsibilities for implementation. It references the HEAL Act, the Washington State Department of Health’s Environmental Health Disparities Map, and the Lakewood City Council Equity Statement as resources.

As part of the 2021 legislative session, the Legislature released a budget reserve that allocates more than $3 million over the next two years to help the Department of Commerce develop guidelines to help jurisdictions integrate the goals mitigation and resilience into their comprehensive plans.

Conclusion

This blog has highlighted a sample of climate documents available in our new interactive map and related topics web page. If your community has adopted a plan or study that is not included, or if you have any questions or comments, please contact me at lpool@mrsc.org. Also check our website regularly over the coming weeks for more climate blogs and thematic pages on climate equity, GHG emissions and adaptation.


MRSC is a private, nonprofit organization serving local governments in Washington State. Eligible Washington State government agencies can use our free, one-on-one Ask MRSC service to get answers to legal, policy, or financial questions.

About Lisa Pool

Lisa Pool joined MRSC in June 2021. Most recently, she served as Senior Planner for Bellingham. In this role, she primarily focused on long-term planning projects, including the overall city plan and new regulations related to housing. Prior to moving to Bellingham, she worked on regional sustainability and transportation issues for a metropolitan planning organization and led development review for cities and counties in the Midwest.

Lisa holds a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Policy and a Masters in Urban Planning, both from the University of Kansas at Lawrence. She has been a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners since 2009.

SEE ALL MESSAGES BY Pool Lisa

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Reptiles: tips for making planning decisions https://besttoplink.info/reptiles-tips-for-making-planning-decisions/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 00:39:48 +0000 https://besttoplink.info/reptiles-tips-for-making-planning-decisions/ This is Natural England’s “permanent advice” for reptiles. This is a physical planning consideration for local planning authorities (PLA). You should consider these tips when making planning decisions. It is part of a collection of standing advisories for protected species. Following this advice: saves you from having to consult on the impacts of planning apps […]]]>

This is Natural England’s “permanent advice” for reptiles. This is a physical planning consideration for local planning authorities (PLA). You should consider these tips when making planning decisions. It is part of a collection of standing advisories for protected species.

Following this advice:

  • saves you from having to consult on the impacts of planning apps on reptiles in most cases
  • can help you make decisions about development proposals

You may need a qualified ecologist to advise you on the planning application and supporting evidence. You can find one using:

How Reptiles Are Protected

Smooth Snakes, Sand Lizards and Pool Frogs are designated and protected as European Protected Species (PES). PES are protected under the Habitat and Species Conservation Regulations 2017.

It is an offense of:

  • deliberately kill, harm, disturb or capture them
  • deliberately taking or destroying their eggs
  • damage or destroy their breeding sites and resting places
  • possess, control or transport them (alive or dead)

For smooth snakes and sand lizards, it is also an offense under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to intentionally or recklessly:

  • disturbing them while they are occupying a structure or place providing shelter or protection
  • obstruct access to a place of shelter or protection

Other native reptiles are protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It is an offense to kill or injure:

  • adder
  • grass snake
  • common or viviparous lizard
  • slow worm

All native reptiles are listed as rare and most endangered species under Section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act (2006). You must consider the conservation of Section 41 species as part of your planning decision. Learn more about your biodiversity duty.

The promoter must respect the legal protection of reptiles.

You must determine whether the proponent has taken appropriate measures to avoid, mitigate and, as a last resort, compensate for any adverse effects on reptiles in its development proposal.

The developer may need a license for a development proposal or activity that affects sand lizards or smooth snakes.

When to request an investigation

You should request an investigation if:

For example, the proposal site:

  • change the water levels of the site or surrounding area
  • breaking suitable habitat for reptiles

The lack of registration does not mean that there are no reptiles. This could mean that there is no survey data available for this location.

The National Amphibian and Reptile Registration Program (NARRS) provides guidance on types of surveys for reptiles. This document is available on the NARRS website and may not be accessible to assistive technologies.

Survey work may include research:

  • to laze the animals on the banks, piles of wood and edges of wood
  • over and under artificial shelters, such as corrugated sheets or roofing felt

A survey should, at a minimum, assess the likely presence of reptiles in the area affected by the proposed development. The scope of the study should be proportionate to the potential adverse effects of development on reptiles. This may mean a survey of the abundance of reptile habitat and how it is used at the proposed site.

You need to check if the ecologist is qualified and experienced in carrying out reptile surveys. CIEEM publish:

The conservationist should also follow the Biodiversity Code of Practice for Planning and Development (BS 42020:2013) available on the British Standards Institute website. These documents may not be accessible to assistive technologies.

The ecologist must hold the appropriate and up-to-date inventory permit to conduct inventories of smooth snakes and sand lizards.

Assess the effect of development on reptiles

As far as possible, proposals should avoid affecting reptiles. Where this is not possible, you should seek adequate mitigation or compensation measures in the development proposal to enable you to make a development decision.

Activities that can harm reptiles include:

  • loss of links between habitat patches, including hibernation sites and sites used in the active season from April to September
  • reduction in habitat quality, such as deterioration of vegetation
  • increasing the risk of fire on heathland from accidents or arson
  • the effect of increased waste if the proposal increases public access

The promoter will have to verify if he needs a wildlife permit for these activities.

Avoidance, mitigation and compensation measures

To avoid possible effects on reptiles, the developers could redesign the proposal to:

  • altering landscaping and not landscaping areas used by reptiles
  • change the pace of work
  • change working methods

Mitigation and compensation measures could include:

  • use temporary and secure reptile fencing to prevent reptiles from moving into dangerous areas
  • encourage movement by making habitats unsuitable, for example by cutting vegetation in stages during the active season
  • create links with other habitats
  • create a new habitat
  • improvement of existing habitat

Translocation

If there is no reasonable alternative habitat nearby, the proposal could include capturing reptiles and moving them to another location, called a translocation. The new habitat must be able to support reptiles. The proposal should include evidence that the translocation would benefit reptile conservation. Translocation should be considered as a last resort.

In case of transfer of reptiles, the proposal requires a receiving site:

  • close to the development site, and in the same PLA if possible
  • that is at least the same size as the habitat that will be lost, and larger if the habitat lost is of high quality
  • which will perform the same function as the habitat to be lost, for example it has hibernation characteristics
  • with habitat similar to the area that will be lost, including water bodies
  • which does not currently support the same species, but can be improved to make it suitable
  • that will be protected from future development and managed over the long term

The proposal could introduce a small number of reptiles to an area with an existing population if the habitat is improved to support the increase in numbers. He must allow enough time for new habitats to become suitable for reptiles before capturing them.

For more information on mitigation plans and offsetting measures, see the Planner’s Guide to Protected Species and Development.

Planning and licensing terms

If the proposal is likely to affect a protected reptile, the proponent must apply for the appropriate wildlife permit.

Before you can grant a building permit, you must:

  • ensure that any mitigation or offset conditions you impose do not conflict with the requirements of a mitigation license
  • be sure that Natural England will issue a license

You do not need to consult Natural England on the wording or release of any conditions you place on a planning proposal. Natural England are unable to advise on this.

Improve biodiversity

To meet your biodiversity duty, you must suggest ways for the developer to:

  • create new or improved habitats at the development site
  • achieve a net gain in biodiversity through good design, such as green roofs, street trees or sustainable drainage

Site management and monitoring

You should consider the need for site monitoring and management. These measurements will likely be required for licenses for sand lizards, smooth snakes or pool frogs. For the non-PES native reptiles, management and monitoring may be required if the species population is affected by development.

A site management and monitoring plan should aim to maintain a diverse vegetation structure. The plan should include controlling the growth of vegetation, including brush and ferns, by cutting, mowing or grazing. Other fern control methods include herbicide application, rolling or cutting.

The proponent may need to consider controlling the risk of fire and managing predators, such as house cats and pheasants.

Monitoring could include additional investigative work to verify that mitigation measures are working as intended, followed by remedial work if necessary.

The Reptile Management Handbook available on the Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Trust website provides more information on habitat management. This manual may not be accessible to assistive technologies.

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