Irish government faces no-confidence vote after losing majority

Sinn Fein has confirmed it will table a no-confidence motion against the Irish government after the three-party coalition lost its majority following a vote earlier in the week.

Leader Mary Lou McDonald said the party would table the motion in the newspaper next week as the government had ‘now lost its parliamentary majority and failed to tackle the cost of living and housing crises’.

Former Education Minister Joe McHugh voted against the Government’s Mica Repair Scheme Bill, which seeks to compensate property owners in four counties affected by faulty building blocks.

The government has expressed confidence that it will win the vote.

It comes after a centre-right Fine Gael member resigned as party whip on Wednesday after voting against a government bill, which also includes Prime Minister Micheal Martin’s centre-right Fianna Fail and the Green Party.

Former Education Minister Joe McHugh voted against the Government’s Mica Repair Scheme Bill, which seeks to compensate property owners in four counties affected by faulty building blocks.

He leaves the coalition with 79 seats in the 160-seat lower house. However, some of the other lawmakers who have left the government in the past two years continue to support him in important votes.

“He can certainly whip up majorities for one-by-one votes, but two years later we think this government is now out of the game,” Ms McDonald said. RTE Morning Ireland. “They’ve run out of time. They are out of ideas.

With Sinn Fein, Ireland’s main opposition party, also well ahead of any other party in the opinion polls, those aligned with the government are unlikely to vote to overthrow it and bring forward the elections scheduled for 2025.

Irish Minister for Foreign Affairs, Simon Coveney

(PA wire)

Foreign Secretary Simon Coveney said he was very confident the government would win the vote, stressing that it had passed the controversial bill which his colleague resigned this week by four votes.

“I think we’ll have a strong majority of work and that will be clear this week,” Mr Coveney said. TEN.

Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe accused Sinn Fein of being interested in “building a culture of instability”.

“Over the past two years this is a country that has faced an extraordinary test during a pandemic and during that time we had to take extraordinary measures which included shutting down the construction sector for a period of time. time,” Mr. Donohoe said.

“This government has put in place measures that have helped our country recover from a pandemic, helped our economy recover from a pandemic, helped society deal with a threat we have never been confronted.

Additional reports by agencies

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