California farm workers prepare to march to the Capitol

California farmworkers completed their 24-day, 335-mile journey across the state to the Capitol in Sacramento on Friday, joined by scores of supporters for the final leg of their advocacy campaign. The group is urging Governor Gavin Newsom to sign Assembly Bill 2183 into law, which would give them more options and protections when voting for union elections. The United Farm Workers Union supports farm workers on their “peregrinación,” or pilgrimage, from Delano in Kern County to the Capitol. It’s similar to the route César Chávez organized in 1966. According to United Farm Workers President Theresa Romero, AB 2183 reflects how California residents elect elected officials. ask someone to help, by asking someone to drop him off if they want, or in person if they want,” Romero said ahead of the final day of the march. | VIDEO HERE- BELOW | UFW President Teresa Romero speaks on Capitol Hill on farmworker rightsGov. Gavin Newsom’s office said Friday it “cannot support” AB 2183 in its current form. However, the governor’s office said negotiations are ongoing and there is still time to reach an agreement for workers to come together and be represented, and it supports changes to state law. to help organize these workers,” said Newsom communications director Erin Mellon. “Our goal is to establish a system for fair elections, requiring employers to follow rules that guarantee access to unions and provide key enforceable protections to ensure a fair election. If employers fail to follow these rules, they would be subject to an organization under a card verification process.” assumption that the government cannot effectively enforce the laws.” “But it can’t be weak language. We need language that truly protects workers’ rights. Just as we want our vote to count — our vote to be protected — so do agricultural workers,” District 24 Senator Maria Elena Durazo said of the Newsom administration’s response to the negotiations. | RELATED | Why Marching California Farm Workers Want the Newsom Government to Sign Union Voting Rights Bill AB 2183 The group of farm workers met Friday morning in Southside Park on Eighth and T streets and were joined by supporters at 10 a.m. for a march to the west side of the Capitol. Óscar González, Farmer When there were recall attempts, I was knocking on doors in Ventura County to vote no in the recall election. said González. | VIDEO BELOW | Dolores Huerta: “We are here to fight back” organizations that have come forward to support this movement. They made a poster in partnership with the UFW for sale at this rally, in support of the “Road to Sacramento” documentary which documented Delano’s trip to Sacramento. campesinos (agricultural workers). It was time. This march has already taken place. It’s so sad that it’s happening again, but a beautiful thing about seeing all these people around is that we don’t give up,” said Kimberly Gudiño, policy and director of programs at Brown Issues.– KCRA 3’s Andrea Flores contributed to this story.

California farmworkers completed their 24-day, 335-mile journey across the state to the Capitol in Sacramento on Friday, joined by scores of supporters for the final leg of their advocacy campaign.

The group is urging Governor Gavin Newsom to sign Assembly Bill 2183 into law, which would give them more options and protections when voting for union elections.

The United Farm Workers Union supports farm workers on their “peregrinación,” or pilgrimage, from Delano in Kern County to the Capitol. It is similar to the route organized by César Chávez in 1966.

According to United Farm Workers President Theresa Romero, AB 2183 reflects how California residents elect their elected officials.

“Assembly Bill 2183 gives farm workers the ability to vote from home, by mail, ask someone to help, ask someone to drop it off if they want or in person if he wishes,” Romero said ahead of the final. day of the walk.

| VIDEO BELOW | UFW President Teresa Romero speaks on Capitol Hill on farmworker rights

Governor Gavin Newsom’s office said Friday it “cannot support” AB 2183 in its current form.

However, the governor’s office said negotiations were ongoing and there was still time to reach an agreement.

“Governor Newsom looks forward to signing legislation that expands opportunities for agricultural workers to assemble and be represented, and he supports changes to state law to make it easier for these workers to organize,” said Newsom communications director Erin Mellon. “Our goal is to establish a system for fair elections, requiring employers to follow rules that guarantee access to unions and provide key enforceable protections to ensure a fair election. If employers fail to follow these rules, they would be submitted to an organization under a card verification process.

“However, we cannot support an untested postal election process that lacks essential provisions to protect the integrity of the election and relies on the assumption that the government cannot effectively enforce the laws.”

“But it can’t be weak language. We need language that truly protects workers’ rights. Just like we want our vote to count – our vote to be protected – so do agricultural workers,” the senator said. of District 24. Maria Elena Durazo, regarding the Newsom administration’s response to negotiations.

| RELATED | Why Marching California Farmworkers Want Governor Newsom to Sign Union Voting Rights Bill AB 2183

The group of farmworkers gathered Friday morning in Southside Park at Eighth and T streets and were joined by supporters at 10 a.m. for a march to the west side of the Capitol.

Óscar González, himself a farm worker, joined the march in Biola. He says he hopes Newsom will support farm workers like they have supported him.

“When there were recall attempts, I was knocking on doors in Ventura County asking to vote no in the recall election,” González said.

| VIDEO BELOW | Dolores Huerta: “We are here to fight back”


Brown Issues, a statewide youth-led advocacy organization in California that works to train the next generation of brown leaders, was one of countless organizations that came forward to support this movement.

They made a poster in partnership with the UFW for sale at this rally, in support of the documentary “Road to Sacramento” which documented Delano’s trip to Sacramento.

“It was beautiful to see so many people from different walks of life coming together for the campesinos (agricultural workers). It was about time. This march has happened before. It’s so sad that it’s happening again, but a beautiful thing to see all of these people is that we don’t give up,” said Kimberly Gudiño, director of policy and programs at Brown Issues.

— Andrea Flores from KCRA 3 contributed to this story.

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