Admin Subramanian Gives First Cryptocurrency Gift to Institute

Koushik Subramanian has spent much of his professional career working in digital finance, particularly in cybersecurity and more recently in digital assets and blockchain technologies like cryptocurrency, non-fungible tokens (NFTs) and smart contracts.

So it made sense for the 2006 computer engineering graduate, who also sits on the board of Rose-Hulman, to become the first alumnus to give back to Rose-Hulman using cryptocurrency. Subramanian’s $50,000 crypto gift will be used to establish the Subramanian Fund for the Advancement of Technologies in Digital Assets for the Institute.

“I’m super passionate about it,” said Subramanian, who founded drophouse.art in 2022 to combine his interests in art, fashion and crypto. Two years earlier, he had founded Kopper Labs to deploy capital to accelerate the adoption of automation, blockchain and cybersecurity technologies. He has worked as Chief Information Security Officer for Kraken since 2018, overseeing cybersecurity and digital assets globally.

“I have been blessed in my career through my training at Rose to be a thought leader in cybersecurity and digital assets. Knowing what I know now from my career, I have a high degree of confidence that this field is here to stay.

The Form of Giving is the latest example of how Rose-Hulman alumni are constantly finding creative and innovative ways to give back to the top-ranked science, technology, engineering, and math-focused institution.

“I’m really looking forward to seeing the impact of Koushik’s donation, both in how it benefits our students and Rose-Hulman in the long run, but also in how it can help pave the way. to a world where the possibilities are seemingly endless,” said Rose-Hulman President Robert A. Coons. “Cryptocurrency is just one form of these new technologies, so it will be exciting to see what other new and creative ways our alumni discover to continue giving back to Rose.”

Rose-Hulman has created a webpage specifically for digital asset donations, available at www.rose-hulman.edu/about-us/community-and-public-services/institutional-advancement/crypto.html

Appropriately, Subramanian’s crypto giveaway will support student learning in the nationally ranked computer science and software engineering department, as well as cross-disciplinary projects involving other majors. Subramanian has collaborated with Associate Professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering Sid Stamm, PhD, on a number of senior project ideas as well as other practical and research opportunities.

“There are so many options,” Subramanian said. “For starters, we can get creative by designing senior projects that automate campus-like processes. These projects could, step by step, create an on-campus blockchain ecosystem that enables digital credentials, crypto payments at the bookstore or even tuition, or even NFTs to engage the alumni community. If we can do that, we’re building a roadmap for the institution to go digital. »

Stamm noted that Subramanian brought “real-world” experiences to the Rose-Hulman campus in 2021 when he visited Stamm’s blockchain elective course.

“Mr. Subramanian’s gift is a great help in supporting our educational opportunities in cryptocurrency – and cybersecurity generally,” Stamm said. prepared for the next big technological breakthrough. His generous gift will help us quickly create new classes and fund cross-disciplinary experiences so students can explore, learn, and innovate in this exciting new field.

Subramanian aims to educate others about the possibilities of blockchain technologies, as well as some of the misnomers.

“I think this is an opportunity to elevate Rose-Hulman in this space in front of her peers and help Rose become a leader in digital assets,” he added. “It allows us to bring more STEM talent to the Midwest and allows Rose to create more programs. In addition, it allows me to work with students who are committed to the subject. There is huge potential in space to solve real-world problems on a large scale and I think we are still very early days. I’m really excited to see how this technology will be applied by the next generation.

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